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Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Talk about computer software/hardware problems, related to digital video or otherwise.

Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby alaskamovieguy » Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:02 pm

Thanks for the feedback Steve. I'll explore the 32bit as a better option! Edit: Perhaps time to dump my PE7 and step up to the big boys table ( Premier Pro CS5) That should operate well with the new system. This would be mostly for video editing and I would still keep my old computor for my ever day use. Since it's a new system the burner and other hardware choices should all be up to speed with 64bit. Also I've tweeked the package to a 300GB 10000 rpm system HDD and stepped slightly back on the processor to the i7 6 core 970 saving a few hundred bucks in the process. I'm probably a little paronoid in wanting to be able to edit avchd smoothly. Thanks again!
Azus Sabertooth X58 1366 MB, 12GB DDR3 1600 RAM, Intel i7 960 CPU, Nividia GTX 470 Graphics, Intel 120GB SSD Primary Drive, 2- 10,000 RPM 300GB Velicoraptors in RAID 0, Seagate 500GB internal, 750W PSU, Win 7 Pro, BDH 20 burner, Canon HF20 HD camera.
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby Steve Grisetti » Sun Feb 20, 2011 10:13 pm

If you're going with Pro CS 5 software, then the 64-bit operating system definitely makes sense!

My mistake for assuming we were talking about a machine for running Premiere Elements on.
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby Bob » Sun Feb 20, 2011 11:33 pm

Premiere Pro CS5 requires a 64-bit OS, so If you heading down that path, Windows 7 64-bit is definitely recommended. I have Premiere Pro CS5 as part of Production Premium CS5 and I am very happy with it. And, for what it's worth, I also have Premiere Elements 7 installed on the same system and it runs great under Windows 7 64-bit. I've had no problems at all with it.

I've been running Windows 7 64-bit since October 2009 and have found it to be very stable. For those that wait for the first service pack to move to a new OS, the wait is nearly over. Service Pack 1 is scheduled for general release February 22nd.
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby alaskamovieguy » Mon Feb 21, 2011 2:27 am

No mistake on your part Steve! I was jumping around a bit on you there. I have PE7 now but would be willing to upgrade to CS5 to accomodate my new 'system to be'. I will try running PE7 first though as pointed out by Bob it may run fine with the 64 bit system. If not I'll shell out the bucks and upgrade. I'm just trying to get to where I can handle avchd better than my old system which was taking forever and dropping so many frames because of the compression. I did some checking and it appears most of my periphials should run on the 64bit system as well. Good info on the service pack Bob. It may even ship with it since I'm just getting ready to order.Thanks a bunch.
Azus Sabertooth X58 1366 MB, 12GB DDR3 1600 RAM, Intel i7 960 CPU, Nividia GTX 470 Graphics, Intel 120GB SSD Primary Drive, 2- 10,000 RPM 300GB Velicoraptors in RAID 0, Seagate 500GB internal, 750W PSU, Win 7 Pro, BDH 20 burner, Canon HF20 HD camera.
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby jackfalbey » Mon Feb 21, 2011 2:29 am

I don't have PRE7, so I can't comment specifically on it, but here are my thoughts:

The performance advantage of the 6-core i7-970 over the quad-core i7 models is definitely NOT worth twice the price. Especially since the LGA 1366 "Nehalem" CPUs and chipsets will not be getting any new models down the road. Intel is fully invested in the newer "Sandy Bridge" architecture, so in order to upgrade your CPU later on, you'll need to buy a new motherboard as well. Save the money for something else (second monitor, camera gear, software, etc.)

Good choice going with the 300GB Velociraptor for the system drive. The price vs performance is coming into line on those. You may want to consider going with a 2-drive RAID0 for your media drive. The extra throughput will help with reading those large video files. I assume you'll have a secure backup of the raw video in case the media drive crashes.

I've been running the much-maligned Vista 64-bit on my desktop since July of '09 with Production Premium CS3 and CS4, as well as Premiere Elements 3, and had absolutely no 64-bit-related problems. Same goes for my laptop running Windows 7 64-bit. When I installed the OS, I made sure to download the latest drivers from the manufacturers websites for all of my components and peripherals. Having 8GB of RAM has come in handy many times, especially when running multiple programs simultaneously or handling large Photoshop files. Remember, a 32-bit program can only use up to 2GB of RAM, but with 12GB in your system you could have five 32-bit programs running using the full 2GB each and still have 2GB left over for Windows. Since more and more programs are being coded to take advantage of a 64-bit OS everyday,I highly recommend going with a 64-bit OS unless all you plan to do is surf the web and run office apps. Plus, you're future-proofed with 64-bit.

The 3GB GT 440 video card really won't do much for you except maybe for gaming. I'd go with a less expensive card ($50-100 range) unless you plan to upgrade to CS5, in which case you'll want to get a Mercury-Playback-Engine-approved video card like the GTX470.

The HP 2010i is only 1600x900 resolution, so you may want to consider upgrading to a monitor that is either 1920x1080 or 1920x1200, just in case you want to play back your HD videos full-screen and pixel-for-pixel. Also, a dual-monitor setup is very nice for video editing. You'll never want to go back to a single monitor again. Most LCD monitors use TN panels; if you really need professional-grade accurate color display, look for a monitor with an S-PVA or S-IPS panel.

Other than that, it looks OK. My Intel: $1000 and Intel: $1500 PCs in the other thread should both be more than adequate for editing AVCHD and are a lot less than the than the $2400 HP you were looking at.

And definitely check out Cineform's NeoScene that I mentioned in the other thread. It makes AVCHD much easier to edit, even on an older PC.

So, to summarize my opinions for your new AVCHD editing PC:
*Windows 7 64-bit
*Core i7 9xx series Quad-core
*12GB RAM (3x4GB sticks so you can upgrade to 24GB later!)
*300GB 10k RPM system drive
*2x1TB RAID0 media drive
*$50-100 video card (or GTX470 for Premiere CS5)
*dual monitors (at least one 1920x1080)
*Cineform NeoScene (purchase at cineform.com)

And if you want to see what a monster $2400 DIY PC looks like, here's your Newegg WishList:
http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/Publi ... r=22647948
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby John 'twosheds' McDonald » Mon Feb 21, 2011 2:42 am

jackfalbey wrote:So, to summarize my opinions for your new AVCHD editing PC:
*Windows 7 64-bit
*Core i7 9xx series Quad-core
*12GB RAM (3x4GB sticks so you can upgrade to 24GB later!)
*300GB 10k RPM system drive
*2x1TB RAID0 media drive
*$50-100 video card (or GTX470 for Premiere CS5)
*dual monitors (at least one 1920x1080)
*Cineform NeoScene (purchase at cineform.com)

And if you want to see what a monster $2400 DIY PC looks like, here's your Newegg WishList:
http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/Publi ... r=22647948


Only changes I might consider would be swapping the velociraptor for an SSD and, as you are likely going CS5, a CUDA card as suggested.
i7 6700k, Z170-P mobo, Win7 64 bit, 32Gb RAM, Samsung 500GB NVME 970 Evo, SanDisk 240GB SSD, LG BD Burner, Akasa card reader, Samsung Monitor, Sony HVR-A1, Synology DS412+ 8TB NAS, Adobe CS6.
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby jackfalbey » Mon Feb 21, 2011 3:03 am

Take a look at the $2400 Newegg WishList I posted, John.

24GB RAM, 120GB SSD for system drive, 2x300GB Velociraptors in RAID0 for media files, CUDA card for CS5, dual 1920x1080 monitors, etc. All that's missing is a keyboard & mouse. Makes me wish I had saved my $$ and waited for a few more years on my DIY build... #-o
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby John 'twosheds' McDonald » Mon Feb 21, 2011 3:16 am

Hi Jack.

My comments were based on the "opinions list" that you posted rather than your US$2,400 recommendation. :-D

Re your self build. It is a fairly similar spec to my self build(?). For me, I don't see any seriously compelling reason to start upgrading my system - but then I am still miniDV based not AVCHD. :???:
i7 6700k, Z170-P mobo, Win7 64 bit, 32Gb RAM, Samsung 500GB NVME 970 Evo, SanDisk 240GB SSD, LG BD Burner, Akasa card reader, Samsung Monitor, Sony HVR-A1, Synology DS412+ 8TB NAS, Adobe CS6.
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby jackfalbey » Mon Feb 21, 2011 3:28 am

Yes, as much as I'd LOVE to build a new Formula 1-level editing rig, I just can't justify the expense. Maybe if business picks up in the next few years, I'll be able to build on whatever the successor to Sandy Bridge turns out to be...
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby Jayell » Mon Feb 21, 2011 10:08 am

Steve Grisetti wrote: you can improve the odds of success with Premiere Elements if you use the 32-bit rather than the 64-bit version of Windows 7.

Is it correct that Premiere Pro uses 64-bit? I haven't had any problems with Elements on my 64-bit system, but am now moving up to Pro. Should that be a consideration for anyone purchasing a new system, but thinking they might move up to Pro in the near future?
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby jackfalbey » Mon Feb 21, 2011 10:27 am

With CS4, only Photoshop is fully 64-bit, but Premiere Pro and After Effects use a trick to take advantage of a 64-bit environment: they spawn multiple "instances" of themselves with each acting as a separate 32-bit program. I've seen RAM usage up to 6GB when rendering or encoding video.

CS5 is fully 64-bit.

And I haven't had any problems running my old 32-bit programs in a 64-bit environment.
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby John 'twosheds' McDonald » Mon Feb 21, 2011 10:32 am

jackfalbey wrote:And I haven't had any problems running my old 32-bit programs in a 64-bit environment.

Same here. No problems whatsoever. :-D
i7 6700k, Z170-P mobo, Win7 64 bit, 32Gb RAM, Samsung 500GB NVME 970 Evo, SanDisk 240GB SSD, LG BD Burner, Akasa card reader, Samsung Monitor, Sony HVR-A1, Synology DS412+ 8TB NAS, Adobe CS6.
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby alaskamovieguy » Mon Feb 21, 2011 12:53 pm

I checked out your newegg $2400 list Jack. Impressive. I will have to assimilate all this great info over the next couple of weeks and decide. Somehow I managed a 2 week vacation in 'the Sandwich Islands' starting in a few days so I will have to wait to order so it doesn't show up on the doorstep while I'm gone. HP wouldnt let me configure a second HDD as a Raid0 array, said there was a conflict, also couldn't go any better on the graphics card than the one I listed so between that and the price I'm leaning towards a self build. Thanks for all the great feedback guys! Off to warm sand in the toes.
Azus Sabertooth X58 1366 MB, 12GB DDR3 1600 RAM, Intel i7 960 CPU, Nividia GTX 470 Graphics, Intel 120GB SSD Primary Drive, 2- 10,000 RPM 300GB Velicoraptors in RAID 0, Seagate 500GB internal, 750W PSU, Win 7 Pro, BDH 20 burner, Canon HF20 HD camera.
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby alaskamovieguy » Tue Feb 22, 2011 12:23 am

I assume when you set up a dedicated drive for your system that includes your programs and misc on it as well and using the raid0 drives only for the video files? Jack, have you seen this test review of the i7 970? http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,2 ... 525,00.asp Just double checking your statement of the extra money spent not being worth the gain of the 970 over the 4 core models. If I assemble a list at newegg and order I assume it's up to me to know about any potential non compatability issues? How do I know if the 'box' is big enough to fit everything? What power source do you recommend? I would also want to add a multi-media card as I do a lot of photography. I know, a lot of questions but you opened the door :-k Seeing as I haven't built a computor before ( but changed and upgraded numerous items) any other advise for my first go around? Misc. items I might overlook on my order? Cooling system? Thanks
Azus Sabertooth X58 1366 MB, 12GB DDR3 1600 RAM, Intel i7 960 CPU, Nividia GTX 470 Graphics, Intel 120GB SSD Primary Drive, 2- 10,000 RPM 300GB Velicoraptors in RAID 0, Seagate 500GB internal, 750W PSU, Win 7 Pro, BDH 20 burner, Canon HF20 HD camera.
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Re: Recommended System Specs for Video Editing

Postby John 'twosheds' McDonald » Tue Feb 22, 2011 4:27 am

alaskamovieguy wrote:How do I know if the 'box' is big enough to fit everything? What power source do you recommend?

My twopennyworth.

If you are going the self build route get a good case so that as you add or upgrade components over the years you'll know that you have both space and cooling. There are several "case review/evaluation" sites if you google. My original case was an Akasa Zen. It was relatively cheap but I couldn't get sufficient cooling for my PC. I later replaced it with an Antec 183. Not cheap, but my temps dropped significantly due to the better case cooling.

I'm with Bobby too about the power supply. Get one bigger than you need. Mine is mainstream brand 650W modular design - more than enough for my needs. I would have gone for 750W or 800W but this one was a really good price.
i7 6700k, Z170-P mobo, Win7 64 bit, 32Gb RAM, Samsung 500GB NVME 970 Evo, SanDisk 240GB SSD, LG BD Burner, Akasa card reader, Samsung Monitor, Sony HVR-A1, Synology DS412+ 8TB NAS, Adobe CS6.
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