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Before & After Photos - Photoshop or Elements

A discussion area specific to the Photoshop Pro versions.

Re: Before & After Photos - Photoshop or Elements

Postby Gerlinde » Fri Aug 12, 2011 5:18 pm

Thank you for your kind words, Paul and Cheryl.
OPR is always looking for more volunteers :-D It was a great way for me to learn Photoshop and they also have a fantastic user forum. You get help, when you get stuck with a photo and everyone is willing to share his knowledge. Kind of like this forum here :TU:
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B) Sony Vaio i7-3632QM,12gb DDR3-1333MHz, GeForce® GT 640M LE (2GB), 750GB (7200rpm), Win10 Pro64-bit
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Re: Before & After Photos - Photoshop or Elements

Postby momoffduty » Fri Aug 12, 2011 5:47 pm

I'll check out the forum there and will pass the link to my brother. Maybe he will share with his photography club.
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Re: Before & After Photos - Photoshop or Elements

Postby _Paz_ » Wed Jan 16, 2013 1:44 am

When you work in Camera Raw for adjustments, don't you have to save the file as a copy so it doesn't change the original?


No, the RAW file is like a negative, you don't 'save' it. After you've made your RAW adjustments, open in Photoshop and save as a .psd or .tiff if you want to print, .jpg if you want to save for the web.

But, if you go through Bridge and look at the same image again, it will be the way you left it when you made adjustments in RAW. That is, if you increased or decreased exposure, when you go back you'll see it with the changes you made. You can tell if you've opened a RAW image by noticing the little symbol with the red check marks I've indicated when you look at your RAW files in Bridge.

Image

If you decide you want to go all the way back to the beginning, open the image in Camera RAW again, and click on the little symbol in the upper right, where I've made an arrow. You'll get a drop down and then click the 'reset defaults' button and that will take you back to the 'original' negative.

Image
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Re: Before & After Photos - Photoshop or Elements

Postby momoffduty » Wed Jan 16, 2013 10:25 am

Thanks Paz for the detailed explanation. Very beautiful images!
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Re: Before & After Photos - Photoshop or Elements

Postby _Paz_ » Wed Jan 16, 2013 6:35 pm

You're welcome, and thank you, Cheryl. This little marina is about 7 miles north of Destin, Florida (in the panhandle), at the top of Choctawhatchee Bay. Love it there.

Back to RAW files. If I have the option to use RAW, I wouldn't dream of not using it. In an example like this, where the surface of the water is constantly changing and the light is fading fast, shooting several exposures to create an HDR combo isn't going to work.

OTOH, shoot in RAW, then open 3 different versions of the same image, one under exposed that is adjusted to bring out the most detail in bleached out areas, one in the middle, and one overexposed to bring out the most detail in the shadows, and you have something to work with. I like to stack the 3 layers with dark on the bottom, middle in middle, and light on top. I might make copies of each layer and hide them just so I have them to go back to if I go too far.

Then I set my eraser at about 10% power and erase whatever is wrong on each layer until I have the best image I can get from that information.

This is an example of that 3 layer eraser blending method I use. I know it isn't the way most people do HDR, but it works pretty well for me.

http://patriceart.com/photosite/jasminehill/wishingwell.html
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