They're here! More Muvipix.com Guides by Steve Grisetti!
The Muvipix.com Guides to Premiere & Photoshop Elements 2020
Not quite sure what our site has to offer?
Check out the
Muvipix Video Tour

Scanning Pictures

Video / Image editing, advanced techniques, computer settings, third party software, shortcuts, workarounds ... share your tips and tricks here.

Scanning Pictures

Postby Greg mgm » Sat Nov 19, 2011 2:53 pm

Considering a new slideshow project and have a question about scanning pictures.
In the past I've either scanned single or multiple pics, then in PS2 cut them up, cropped and resized for video use. Of course it's so time consuming!
Do any of you have tricks or tips on scanning pics? Do you mostly scan one pic at a time, then crop?
User avatar
Greg mgm
Super Contributor
Super Contributor
 
Posts: 616
Joined: Tue May 15, 2007 7:54 pm
Location: Pine Cove, CA

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby John 'twosheds' McDonald » Sat Nov 19, 2011 3:31 pm

My Epson scanner auto detects multiple images when I scan so I don't need to separate them by editing in Photoshop.
i7 6700k, Z170-P mobo, Win10 64 bit, 32Gb RAM, Samsung 500GB NVME 970 Evo SSD x 2, LG BD Burner, Akasa card reader, Dell U2719D Monitor, Sony HVR-A1, Synology DS412+ 8TB NAS, Adobe CS6.
User avatar
John 'twosheds' McDonald
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 3929
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 11:57 am
Location: Carini, Sicily

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby Chuck Engels » Sat Nov 19, 2011 3:58 pm

My scanner also has detection for multiple images but I use the Multiple Scan tool in Photoshop Elements to separate them automatically, works great. There is a free tutorial based on Photoshop Elements 7
http://muvipix.com/products.php?searchp ... 0&btn.y=13
ib-Dividing Scanned Photos (PSE7)
1. Thinkpad W530 Laptop, Core i7-3820QM Processor 8M Cache 3.70 GHz, 16 GB DDR3, NVIDIA Quadro K1000M 2GB Memory.

2. Cybertron PC - Liquid Cooled AMD FX6300, 6 cores, 3.50ghz - 32GB DDR3 - MSI GeForce GTX 960 Gaming 4G, 4GB Video Ram, 1024 Cuda Cores.
User avatar
Chuck Engels
Super Moderator
Super Moderator
 
Posts: 17676
Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 10:58 pm
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby Bob » Sat Nov 19, 2011 4:14 pm

Photoshop Elements has the scan and divide photos feature. Photoshop CS has File > Automate > Crop & Straighten Photos which is similar.
User avatar
Bob
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 5864
Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2007 4:49 am
Location: Southern California, USA

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby Greg mgm » Sat Nov 19, 2011 5:25 pm

Glad I asked. I don't have any of those programs and my scanner is older and doesn't detect multiple pics.
I need to do some updating!
User avatar
Greg mgm
Super Contributor
Super Contributor
 
Posts: 616
Joined: Tue May 15, 2007 7:54 pm
Location: Pine Cove, CA

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby momoffduty » Sat Nov 19, 2011 5:29 pm

I've tried the multiple scan in PSE and prefer to scan one photo at a time. Most of my projects need to have the photos in order and it is easier for me to go thru a stack. For a family history project I was writing descriptions down for each photo as I scanned and typed up a word doc to go with the photo CD.
aka Cheryl
Intel i7 3770, Windows 7 Pro w/SP1, 64 bit, Intel 520 Series SSD, 32G RAM, 2 – 2T RAID, (1T external), GTX 550 Ti graphics
User avatar
momoffduty
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2007 10:43 am
Location: near St. Louis

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby Kent Frost » Wed Oct 16, 2013 8:19 pm

This is me reviving a 2 year old thread, but I couldn't help but pitch in on this:

We just recently did a slideshow video for my girlfriend's brother who passed away last month. Here's something I discovered: Even though you can easily scan multiple pics at once using your scanner, something I noticed is that my Epson will auto-expose based on what you section off to have scanned. Therefore, even if you put 6 photos on the scanner bed, when you section off only 1 photo at a time, it will give a much better readout for that individual picture, but not so much if you try doing the same thing for multiple pics at once. Not only that, but you'll have better control over filesizes if you're doing high-res scans of single pics that are equal to a 15+ megapixel picture from a digital camera rather than 6 photos at a 50 or 60 megapixel equivalence. The images came out with better color depth and exposure, and replicated the original feel much more accurately.
Dell Studio XPS 8100, Intel Core i7 2.8GHz, 4GB RAM, 64-Bit Win7. Camera gear: 2x Canon 550D's, 1x Canon EOS 6D body, Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 & 17-50mm f2.8, Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 & 24-70mm f/2.8L, and two 420EX flashes.
User avatar
Kent Frost
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 338
Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2013 2:48 pm

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby Ron Hunter » Thu Oct 17, 2013 8:53 am

So, I interpret your comments as "single photo scanning" produces better results than "multiple photos that are separated by software"?
Desktop: HPE-580T, i7-950 (3.07GHz), 16GB RAM, Win'7 64-bit Home Premium, PSE12/PRE12, Lightroom 5.
Laptop: MacBook Pro (retina), 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD, Final Cut Pro X, Motion 5.
Cameras (in use): Panasonic GH4/Canon HFR400/Canon HV30, GoPro HD Hero2.
User avatar
Ron Hunter
Super Contributor
Super Contributor
 
Posts: 953
Joined: Fri Sep 19, 2008 7:13 pm
Location: North Carolina

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby Kent Frost » Thu Oct 17, 2013 2:23 pm

In my experience, yes. You can get okay results doing them all at once, but the scanner itself concentrates its exposure settings better on individual images.
Dell Studio XPS 8100, Intel Core i7 2.8GHz, 4GB RAM, 64-Bit Win7. Camera gear: 2x Canon 550D's, 1x Canon EOS 6D body, Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 & 17-50mm f2.8, Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 & 24-70mm f/2.8L, and two 420EX flashes.
User avatar
Kent Frost
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 338
Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2013 2:48 pm

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby Bob » Thu Oct 17, 2013 6:37 pm

I normally scan one photo at a time. But, if I have a lot to scan, I may scan multiple at a time -- I group similar photos together when I do that. I'll set the scan resolution to a value appropriate to my intended purpose.

I use Vuescan scanner software instead of the software that came with my scanner. It comes in two flavors, standard and professional. I have the professional edition which includes unlimited updates and extra features. One of the extra features is the ability to store the raw scanner sensor data as a file. Vuescan can open the raw file and process it as if it were an original scan. You can optionally save in DNG format and open and process the file in Adobe Camera Raw (or Lightroom if you have that). I've grown fond of saving in DNG and that's become my preferred workflow. Exposure and resolution has not been an issue doing it that way.
User avatar
Bob
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 5864
Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2007 4:49 am
Location: Southern California, USA

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby Kent Frost » Thu Oct 17, 2013 8:49 pm

The next time you do, try this: Go ahead and load as many pics on the scanner as you want, and then choose an image in the bunch and see what it looks like in the preview when you select all images to be scanned at once, then draw a square around just that image (be careful to stay inside the edges of the pic). See if you can tell a difference in exposure and color quality between both ways. I have an Epson Stylus NX215 scanner/printer, and it just seems to give me better results one at a time.
Dell Studio XPS 8100, Intel Core i7 2.8GHz, 4GB RAM, 64-Bit Win7. Camera gear: 2x Canon 550D's, 1x Canon EOS 6D body, Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 & 17-50mm f2.8, Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 & 24-70mm f/2.8L, and two 420EX flashes.
User avatar
Kent Frost
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 338
Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2013 2:48 pm

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby Chuck Engels » Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:13 am

I think it depends a lot on the scanner and the software. I tend to "fix" every image anyway in Photoshop so I scan clean with no adjustments, all of the images look just like the originals and they are all different. Then I split them all in Photoshop and make adjustments one by one there.
1. Thinkpad W530 Laptop, Core i7-3820QM Processor 8M Cache 3.70 GHz, 16 GB DDR3, NVIDIA Quadro K1000M 2GB Memory.

2. Cybertron PC - Liquid Cooled AMD FX6300, 6 cores, 3.50ghz - 32GB DDR3 - MSI GeForce GTX 960 Gaming 4G, 4GB Video Ram, 1024 Cuda Cores.
User avatar
Chuck Engels
Super Moderator
Super Moderator
 
Posts: 17676
Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 10:58 pm
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Scanning Pictures

Postby Kent Frost » Fri Oct 18, 2013 10:25 am

Chuck Engels wrote:I think it depends a lot on the scanner and the software. I tend to "fix" every image anyway in Photoshop so I scan clean with no adjustments, all of the images look just like the originals and they are all different. Then I split them all in Photoshop and make adjustments one by one there.

I do the same, but my edits need less work using this method.
Dell Studio XPS 8100, Intel Core i7 2.8GHz, 4GB RAM, 64-Bit Win7. Camera gear: 2x Canon 550D's, 1x Canon EOS 6D body, Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 & 17-50mm f2.8, Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 & 24-70mm f/2.8L, and two 420EX flashes.
User avatar
Kent Frost
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 338
Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2013 2:48 pm


Return to Tips and Tricks 


Similar topics


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron