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Assign NTFS folder to DVD drive, bypass Media DownLoader.

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Assign NTFS folder to DVD drive, bypass Media DownLoader.

Postby RJ Johnston » Sun Apr 22, 2007 3:40 pm

You can assign one or more empty NTFS folders to a DVD drive in addition to assigning the conventional drive letter. This will let you add media to an Adobe Premiere Elements project directly from a DVD drive without having to use the media downloader to transfer the files to your hard drive first.

Let's say you have a DVD that is a backup of your DV-AVI clips, and you want to extract subclips from the many files on the DVD. Normally you would have to use the media downloader to transfer the files to your hard drive first. But if you have assigned an empty NTFS folder to your DVD drive, you can add the media directly from the DVD to the media bin by navigating to the "empty" folder.

Because the DVD drive is no 7200 RPM disc drive, playback of media added to the timeline is impossible, but you can still scrub to check the contents. You can create subclips, and then use the archiver to extract just the media you need.

To assign one or more empty NTFS folders to a DVD drive: Go to START, right-click on My Computer, click Manage from the pop-up menu. In the Computer Management Console, click on Disk Management (just below Disk Defragmenter). On the right side of the console, right-click on your DVD drive and click Change Drive Letters and Paths. Click the Add... button. For the Mount option, use the browse button to select a NTFS hard drive and create an empty folder. When you are all done with that, you should be able to navigate to the "empty" folder and see the files on the DVD drive.

It's fun and educational!
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Postby Steve Grisetti » Sun Apr 22, 2007 6:29 pm

Another clever tip, Robert! thanks!
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Postby Bobby » Sun Apr 22, 2007 9:16 pm

Whew, that went right over my head.

Robert, could you give us a quick tutorial as to what an NTSC folder is?

Thanks...
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Postby RJ Johnston » Sun Apr 22, 2007 9:33 pm

That should have gone over your head. I said NTSC and should have said NTFS, a file system your hard drive has been formatted in -- NTFS as opposed to FAT32. So you need to create an empty folder on an NTFS drive and assign that to the DVD drive.
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Postby Bobby » Mon Apr 23, 2007 7:05 am

I should have figgered that out for myself as an obvious typo, but even though I think I am a pretty savvy PC guy (I run my own consulting business) you just never know.

Thanks!
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